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    Joshua Benton
    Fifty years ago, with humanity about to reach the moon, The New York Times gave a poet a corner of the front page.
    Laura Hazard Owen
    Plus: How college students evaluate fake vs. real news, and an algorithm that doesn’t just identify fake news but explains why.
    Ken Doctor
    A combined GannHouse (Gatenett?) would own 1 out of every 6 daily newspapers in America. The goal? Buy two or three more years to figure out how to make money in digital.
    Christine Schmidt
    “We’re ultimately trying to do this as small and nimble as possible so that we can be seeing what’s working and throw out what’s not — and quickly being able to shift in a way that’s a little bit harder when you’re working with a 150-year-old newspaper.”
    Christine Schmidt
    “The toll of moderating uncivil comments may be much stronger for moderators putting in several hours or a full day.”
    Christine Schmidt
    Recipients include 100 Days in Appalachia, Block Club Chicago, Chalkbeat, and the Tyler Loop, among others.
    Nicholas Quah
    “There remains a lot we don’t know, and I have strong feeling we’re witnessing a little shard of a much larger, complicated soul-searching process.”
    Nicholas Quah
    Plus: Tim Ferriss brings back ads, two American companies go British, and the mystery of the one-star iTunes review.
    Joshua Benton
    When one news publisher has a story about something bad — a disaster, a death, or just general terribleness — other publishers move more quickly to match it than they do with good news.
    Christine Schmidt
    “I really believe in the power of people to organize and advocate from the bottom up to create some solutions to this. I don’t think these solutions are going to come out of commercial media.”
    Laura Hazard Owen
    Plus: All the media literacy resources, and giving parents information about the flu vaccine.
    Alana Schetzer
    Lumping together disinformation campaigns with news the government says isn’t in the “public interest” is a recipe for abuse.
    Christine Schmidt
    Sixteen percent of Americans pay for news, a report earlier this year found. It’s not exactly trickling down to local outlets.
    Christine Schmidt
    “We’re Switzerland…We’re not anybody’s competitor. We’re in a good place to do good and raise money statewide and use that money for improving journalism.”
    Laura Hazard Owen
    “Censorship is a way of life in China right now. Everybody knows that whatever they say and share is controlled by the government. But our traffic has been rising, especially this summer, with all of the big news out of the trade war and the Hong Kong protests, as well as some of the sensitive anniversaries of this year.”
    Uli Köppen
    For news outlets to successfully innovate, interdisciplinary teams are essential. Here’s how to make them work.
    Nicholas Quah
    Plus: The role of star power in launching shows, the news peg that arrives after the show is done, and Netflix adds a podcast audio track.
    Christine Schmidt
    “This didn’t take a ton of capital. It just took a lot of willingness on the part of a lot of different folks to collectively figure out what we should do, where are the gaps, and how we can fill them.”
    Christine Schmidt
    “The source of power is the people in the community volunteering to foster these sorts of conversations and have them be accessed by trusted local media partners.”
    Nicholas Quah
    Plus: China cracks down on the audio market, British reality fuels a British podcast, and a Feisty new show.
    Joshua Benton
    That a local daily was having trouble making money isn’t news. But that the national chains weren’t willing to buy it on the cheap is.
    Ken Doctor
    The Times knows its editors’ judgment of what’s important is one of its critical selling points. But in order to surface more than a sliver of its journalism each day, it’s now willing to respond to readers’ interests in a much bigger way.
    Joshua Benton
    Cost-cutting by newspaper chains has moved up print deadlines that even the biggest stories can’t make the paper if they happen after 6 p.m. That’s what happened in Nashville this week when Vanderbilt won the College World Series.
    Laura Hazard Owen
    Plus: A fake news game that seems to inoculate players against fake news.
    Subhayan Mukerjee and Sílvia Majó-Vázquez
    “Given the dearth of empirical studies about news audience behavior in the world’s largest democracy, our study provides a benchmark for future comparative research on news consumption across platforms and across countries to build on.”
    Christine Schmidt
    “We’re living in an age of journalism where people want to help each other and are prioritizing collaboration over competition. We want to seize on that in a way that ensures no matter who is in the newsroom there’s still a mechanism for them to use this.”
    Christine Schmidt
    “This represents five full-time correspondents working in different parts of the world, as well as at least five freelancers each month.”
    Anne Powell, John Wiley, and Peter Gray
    The Journal went on a quest to identify the user actions — an app download, an article share, repeat reading of a particular reporter’s stories — that can turn a new subscriber into a loyal one. Then it turned that knowledge into churn-reducing action.
    Laura Hazard Owen
    Cable news is growing, local TV news is declining, and network news is roughly flat.
    Laura Hazard Owen
    “If the publisher ecosystem is healthy, then SmartNews is healthy. That’s going to be an important thrust going forward.”
    Laura Hazard Owen
    “It’s not a science story for us here in South Florida. It’s not some kind of theoretical exploration. It’s real. It’s what many in our community experience in their neighborhoods.”
    Nicholas Quah
    Plus: A British podcast company finds surprising success stateside, the Supreme Court provides a S02E14 for In the Dark, and a documentary about Freaknik.
    Mona Kasra
    Whether an image looks like a random Facebook post or part of a New York Times story doesn’t make much of a difference. But your level of experience with the Internet and image editing does.
    Christine Schmidt
    A growing number of news sites block incognito readers, figuring they’re probably trying to get around a paywall. But a change from Google will again let people reset their meter with a keystroke.
    Joshua Benton
    Just because people like to chat on their phones doesn’t mean they want to chat with you, news organizations.
    Laura Hazard Owen
    Plus: Updates from GlobalFact 6 and The Verge’s Facebook content moderation expose No. 2.
    Christine Schmidt
    “They said: ‘We don’t have a CRM. We have a plugin that manages who’s paid, and we have Mailchimp to email people.’ Honestly, that moment when they said ‘send us a CSV,’ we realized this was nuts.”
    Joshua Benton
    For the past decade, location-tagged tweets have been a useful (if imperfect) tool for anyone trying to connect time, place, and information in ways that told us something about the world.
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