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Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

is a nonprofit membership organization that provides training and reporting resources to journalists. The program is housed at the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri.

IRE is home to organizations and reporting projects like the , the IRE Resource Center, and DocumentCloud. The organization also presents the annual IRE Awards, which recognizes the best investigative work in print, online, or broadcast.

IRE was by an informal gathering of journalists in Reston, Va., who came together to share their tips and resources on investigative reporting. A year later in 1976 IRE held its first conference in Indianapolis, attracting 300 journalists. The organization was founded with the help of a grant from the Lilly Endowment.

In 1976 one of IRE’s founding members, Don Bolles of The Arizona Republic, was while investigating a story on organized crime. Fellow journalists and IRE members , producing what would become “The Arizona Project.”

NICAR was as companion program to IRE for the purpose of helping journalists find and use electronic information in reporting. Since its inception, NICAR has maintained a large collection of government data for use by newsrooms. Both IRE and NICAR provide regular training programs, workshops, annual conferences and other resources for journalists.

In 2011 DocumentCloud, the the set of tools that allows journalists to host documents and make them searchable to the public, as the project’s original funding from the Knight Foundation was set to expire.

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Primary author: Justin Ellis. Main text last updated: June 12, 2014.
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The Awl is a New York-based blog that covers media, culture, and politics. The site was founded in April 2009 by ex-Gawker writers Choire Sicha and Alex Balk and former Radar employee David Cho. The site has an irreverent tone similar to Gawker’s, though at its launch, it was intended as an alternative to Gawker’s…

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Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The AndroidForMobile Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.