about  /   archives  /   contact  /   subscribe  /       
Share this entry
Make this entry better

What are we missing? Is there a key link we skipped, or a part of the story we got wrong?

Let us know — we’re counting on you to help Encyclo get better.

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Key links:
Primary website:
Primary Twitter:

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

is a nonprofit membership organization that provides training and reporting resources to journalists. The program is housed at the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri.

IRE is home to organizations and reporting projects like the , the IRE Resource Center, and DocumentCloud. The organization also presents the annual IRE Awards, which recognizes the best investigative work in print, online, or broadcast.

IRE was by an informal gathering of journalists in Reston, Va., who came together to share their tips and resources on investigative reporting. A year later in 1976 IRE held its first conference in Indianapolis, attracting 300 journalists. The organization was founded with the help of a grant from the Lilly Endowment.

In 1976 one of IRE’s founding members, Don Bolles of The Arizona Republic, was while investigating a story on organized crime. Fellow journalists and IRE members , producing what would become “The Arizona Project.”

NICAR was as companion program to IRE for the purpose of helping journalists find and use electronic information in reporting. Since its inception, NICAR has maintained a large collection of government data for use by newsrooms. Both IRE and NICAR provide regular training programs, workshops, annual conferences and other resources for journalists.

In 2011 DocumentCloud, the the set of tools that allows journalists to host documents and make them searchable to the public, as the project’s original funding from the Knight Foundation was set to expire.

Recent AndroidForMobile Lab coverage:
March 16, 2018 / Shan Wang
Why do people go to Wikipedia? A survey suggests it’s their desire to go down that random rabbithole — What’s motivated people to visit the Wikipedia pages they’re reading? Wikipedia recently tried to answer that question at scale by asking a sample of Wikipedia readers last June, “Why are you reading th...
March 16, 2018 / Alan Soon
The News Lens in Taiwan is doing what media startups in the region hesitate to do — acquiring other sites — Just three months into the year, The News Lens, itself a news startup, had already acquired two separate Chinese-language sites: a tech site, Inside, and a site for sports fans, Sports Vision. “By 2017, we were hit...
March 16, 2018 / Laura Hazard Owen
Could students’ media literacy be compared across countries, like math scores? — Heads up Wikipedia, YouTube’s coming. YouTube will add “information cues” — i.e., Wikipedia article links — to some of its videos, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki said at SXSW this week. Wired’s ...
March 15, 2018 / Christine Schmidt
Here’s how to make VR content that actually helps users empathize and take action — Sure, virtual reality can help news organizations tell stories that their audiences wouldn’t be able to imagine or relate to in other ways. But are the efforts actually resulting in greater empathy? A report from t...
March 15, 2018 / Shan Wang
The Join the Beat project wants to tease out better ways of working with an audience directly and regularly on stories — Think of the reporting done by David Fahrenthold of The Washington Post around Donald Trump’s charitable giving (or lack thereof) — done in public, in direct engagement with readers and sources, in a way that mad...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Justin Ellis. Main text last updated: June 12, 2014.
Make this entry better
How could this entry improve? What's missing, unclear, or wrong?
Name (optional)
Email (optional)
Center for Public Integrity logo

The Center for Public Integrity is a nonprofit news organization based in Washington, D.C., that produces investigative journalism on public-interest issues. The center was founded by Charles Lewis in 1989, who was its director until 2005. Its staff has fluctuated between 25 to more than 50 throughout the 2000s and 2010s; most recently, it laid…

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The AndroidForMobile Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.