• Lab
  • AndroidForMobile Foundation at
    HOME
              
    LATEST STORY
    Notifications every 2 minutes: This in-depth look at how people really use WhatsApp shows why fighting fake news there is so hard
    ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
    Nov. 2, 2018, 11:07 a.m.
    LINK:   |   Posted by: Christine Schmidt   |   November 2, 2018

    Halloween is over so you know it’s time for sleigh bells — and Santa’s bringing matched funding for your favorite nonprofit newsroom.

    NewsMatch, an initiative from the Institute for Nonprofit News and the News Revenue Hub, officially opened for donations this week for its third year. More than 150 nonprofit journalism organizations that have signed up ahead of time can encourage their supporters to donate to their cause and receive a double-donation of up to $25,000 from a $3 million pool from major journalism benefactors. (Considering the New York Times is now on track to earn more than $600 million in digital this year, maybe you could chip in a little something for a local newsroom.)

    This grassroots fundraising campaign is funded by $3 million from a group of mostly journalism-friendly foundations, including (new this year) $1 million from Facebook. The Knight Foundation started NewsMatch in 2016 with a total of $1.2 million in donations, and more funders came onboard in 2017 to help raise . (Disclosure: AndroidForMobile Lab has received funding from Knight in the past, and the AndroidForMobile Foundation has participated in NewsMatch before.)

    donated to a nonprofit newsroom for the first time in the fourth quarter of 2017 — and this year, as nonprofit news now pulls in almost $350 million in total annual revenue, NewsMatch aims to . Nonprofit newsrooms reported individual giving as just a third of all revenue streams for 2018, according to the Institute for Nonprofit News.

    .

    Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
     
    Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
    Notifications every 2 minutes: This in-depth look at how people really use WhatsApp shows why fighting fake news there is so hard
    “In India, citizens actively seem to be privileging breadth of information over depth…Indians at this moment are not themselves articulating any kind of anxiety about dealing with the flood of information in their phones.”
    Facebook probably didn’t want to be denying it paid people to create fake news this week, but here we are
    Plus: WhatsApp pays for misinformation research and a look at fake midterm-related accounts (“heavy on memes, light on language”).
    How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes
    “We have seen this rapid rise in deep learning technology and the question is: Is that going to keep going, or is it plateauing? What’s going to happen next?”