• Lab
  • AndroidForMobile Foundation at
    HOME
              
    LATEST STORY
    How do you monetize personality? Danish newsletter startup Føljeton has a few ideas
    ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
    April 12, 2018, 9:30 a.m.
    Reporting & Production

    Former ProPublica journalists are launching a newsroom to cover the impact of technology on society

    “I’ve long wanted to build a newsroom around this concept of pairing technical experts with journalists. So that is what this newsroom will be about.”

    ProPublica investigative journalist and data scientist are leaving the company to start a newsroom built around investigating technology and algorithms, the two announced this week.

    As Mark Zuckerberg testifies before Congress this week about Facebook’s failure to protect user data, the timing of this new venture seems particularly good — but, Angwin told me, it’s been a long time coming. She was at The Wall Street Journal for 13 years, and in 2010 she built an investigative team there that paired programmers and journalists and produced a three-year series called looking at the rise of the surveillance economy. Her book was published in 2014.

    In 2014, she and built a similar team pairing programmers and journalists. That team produced a series called “,” which explores algorithmic injustice.

    “I’ve long wanted to build a newsroom around this concept of pairing technical experts with journalists,” Angwin told me in an email. “So that is what this newsroom will be about.” Her cofounder, Jeff Larson, has been at ProPublica for over 10 years as a web developer and data scientist and has been on the programming side of much of the work Angwin’s done there.

    The new venture, which will be a nonprofit funded by donations and philanthropy, will be based in New York City, with a presence in the Bay Area. “We will cover the impact of technology on society,” Angwin told me. “That includes covering the big platform companies, but also the tech that is used in other aspects of life — hopefully through investigations like the ones we did of the used in criminal justice and the algorithms that generate . We also plan to build tools, similar to the , that allow the public to understand technological issues.”

    Angwin and Larson hope to start hiring in the fall, with a launch in early 2019.”We hope to build a substantial newsroom that aims to publish daily,” Angwin said.

    Visualization of a Toledo 65 algorithm by used under a Creative Commons license.

    POSTED     April 12, 2018, 9:30 a.m.
    SEE MORE ON Reporting & Production
    SHARE THIS STORY
       
     
    Join the 45,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
    How do you monetize personality? Danish newsletter startup Føljeton has a few ideas
    “When they wrote to us on Facebook Messenger to get the subscription, we got the feeling that this marked a big shift in their lives — going from teens to adults.”
    Who’s who in local news: A guide to the biggest brains and bank accounts in the fight for local journalism
    Local news consortiums, labs, associations, and more.
    Newsonomics: Still another Tronc drama, as John Lynch re-enters the business
    As much of Tronc’s turbulence looks to be clearing, new questions are emerging about who will next lead the big metro chain.