• Lab
  • AndroidForMobile Foundation at
    HOME
              
    LATEST STORY
    With in-article chat bots, BBC is experimenting with new ways to introduce readers to complex topics
    ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
    July 30, 2013, 1:34 p.m.
    LINK:   |   Posted by: Caroline O'Donovan   |   July 30, 2013

    When there’s a lot of innovation going on around a particular issue, it can be hard to keep track of who has already tried what, when, and how it went. One major trend unfolding right now is experimentation around fact-checking; there are dozens of startups, open source projects, and collaborations looking at how we can cheaply, quickly, and accurately figure out if something published on the web is true or not.

    , a self-professed “verification junky,” works for an organization that supports journalism in the public interest. Today, an online “directory of tools for verifying, fact checking and assessing the validity of social media and user generated content.”

    Verification and misinformation isn’t one problem but two: 1) preventing errors and 2) correcting errors and limiting their spread. As such, we need a range of responses including, but not limited to: training, shifts in norms, new tools, better processes and forms of accountability. And, critically, these ideas and debates cannot stop at the newsroom, but must also engage the public, readers, and audiences who are active and critical participants in the networked journalism.

    is one contribution to that work. I hope you enjoy it.

    Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
     
    Join the 45,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
    With in-article chat bots, BBC is experimenting with new ways to introduce readers to complex topics
    “For us, this is a way to let people read and ask questions at their own pace, instead of having them read through long screens of text. Often people aren’t engaged in stories because they haven’t had the right context.”
    Can we keep media literacy from becoming a partisan concept like fact checking?
    Plus: Screen time debates, and what the data says about kids and smartphones.
    After years of testing, The Wall Street Journal has built a paywall that bends to the individual reader
    Non-subscribers visiting WSJ.com now get a score, based on dozens of signals, that indicates how likely they’ll be to subscribe. The paywall tightens or loosens accordingly: “The content you see is the output of the paywall, rather than an input.”
    our company

    подробно