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    April 29, 2011, 10:30 a.m.

    This Week in Review: WikiLeaks’ forced hand, a Patch recruiting push, and two sets of news maxims

    Every Friday, Mark Coddington sums up the week’s top stories about the future of news.

    Leaking gets competitive: WikiLeaks made its first major document release in five months — during which time its founder, Julian Assange, was arrested, released on bail, and put under house arrest — this week, publishing regarding the Guantánamo Bay prison along with 10 media partners. (As always, The Nation’s Greg Mitchell’s WikiLeaks is the place to go for every detail you could possibly need to know.)

    That’s more media partners than WikiLeaks has worked with previously, and it includes several first-timers, such as the Washington Post and McClatchy. As the Columbia Journalism Review’s Joel Meares , the list of partners doesn’t include the New York Times and the Guardian, the two English-language newspapers who worked with WikiLeaks in its first media collaboration last summer. Despite being shut out, those two organizations were still able to force WikiLeaks’ hand in publishing the leak, as the Huffington Post’s Michael Calderone .

    The Times got their hands on the documents independently, then passed them on to the Guardian and NPR. This meant that, unlike the news orgs that got the info from WikiLeaks, they were operating without an embargo. As they prepared to publish last Sunday, WikiLeaks lifted its embargo early for its own partners (though the first to publish was actually the Telegraph, a WikiLeaks partner).

    The New York Times’ Brian Stelter and Noam Cohen that WikiLeaks “has become such a large player in journalism that some of its secrets are no longer its own to control.” But, as they reported, WikiLeaks itself didn’t seem particularly perturbed about it.

    Patch’s reaches for more bloggers: AOL seems to be undergoing a different overhaul every week since it bought the Huffington Post earlier this year, and this week the changes are at its hyperlocal initiative Patch, which is hoping to to its sites over the next week or two in what its editor-in-chief called a “full-on course correction.”

    While talking to , AOL’s folks played down the degree of change it’s implementing, explaining that these new bloggers (who will be recruited from, among other sources, the sites’ frequent commenters) aren’t disrupting the basic Patch model of one full-time editor per site. In fact, they’ll be unpaid, something that’s been a bit of a for AOL and HuffPo lately.

    Business Insider’s Nicholas Carlson , saying volunteer bloggers can become “extremely effective word-of-mouth marketers” and “excellent pageview machines” with, of course, “manageable” salaries. Others from and were a little more skeptical of the no-pay factor. Lehigh j-prof Jeremy Littau with a more systemic aspect of the new blogs, which will exist both on the writer’s own site and on Patch. Splitting up the conversation with that arrangement won’t be helpful for the individual blogs or for the local blogosphere as a whole, he said: “I see something developing that leads to less population in the local blogosphere and a walled-off system that operates on Patch. At worst, it will lead to parallel and fracture[d] conversations online, which is death when we’re talking about hyperlocal.”

    Two new media manifestos: Two New York j-profs — and two of the more prominent future-of-news pundits online these days — both published manifestos of sorts this week, and both are worth a read. Jay Rosen summed up in 25 years of teaching and thinking about it at NYU, and CUNY’s Jeff Jarvis outlining his philosophy of news economics.

    Rosen’s post touched on several of the themes that have colored his blog and Twitter feed over the past few years, including the value of increasing participation, the failure of “objectivity,” and the need for usefulness and context in news. But while the ideas weren’t exactly new, the conversation they generated was stimulating. The comments chase down some interesting tangents, and GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram about participation, arguing that even if the number of users who want to participate is relatively low, opening up the process can still be immensely important in improving journalism. Rosen also inspired TBD’s Steve Buttry to “what I know about the news business” post.

    Like Rosen’s post, Jarvis’ wouldn’t break a whole lot of ground for those already familiar with his ideas, but it summed them up in a helpfully pithy format. He focused heavily on providing real value (“The only thing that matters to the market is value”), the importance of engagement, and finding efficiencies in infrastructure and collaboration. His post contains plenty of pessimism about the current newspaper business model, and and FishbowlNY’s defended him against the idea that he’s just a doomsayer.

    Times paywall bits: The New York Times spent a to develop its paid-content system, and it will be spending another $13 million on the plan this year, mostly for promotion. Women’s Wear Daily , which include posters around New York as well as TV spots. PaidContent’s Robert Andrews the Times’ pay plan to that of the other Times (the one in London, owned by Rupert Murdoch), noting that the New York Times’ plan should allow them to draw more revenue while maintaining their significant online influence, something the Times of London hasn’t done at all (though it’s largely by choice).

    Meanwhile, Terry Heaton found another (perhaps more convoluted) , tweeting links to Times stories that he can’t access. And elsewhere at the Times, the Lab’s Megan Garber explored the Times’ R&D Lab’s efforts to map the way Times stories are shared online.

    And elsewhere in paywalls, the CEO of the McClatchy newspaper chain has reversed his anti-paywall stance and said this week the company is for some of its larger papers, and Business Insider to another online paid-content company, Tiny Pass.

    Apps, news, and pay: In his outgoing post on Poynter’s Mobile Media blog, Damon Kiesow had a for news organizations’ forays into mobile media — they’re too much like their print counterparts to be truly called innovative. But he did add a reason for optimism, pointing to the New York Times’ News.me and the Washington Post’s Trove: “Neither is a finished product or a perfect one. But both were created by newspaper companies that put resources into research and development.”

    Media analyst local news needs to start moving toward mobile media to reach full effectiveness, laying out the model of an aggregated local news app pulling various types of media. For maximum engagement, that app had better include audio, according to some NPR statistics reported by the Lab’s Andrew Phelps.

    There may a bigger place for paid apps than we’ve thought: Instapaper’s Marco Arment twice pulled the free version of the app for about a month and found that sales actually increased. He against free apps, saying they bring low conversion rates, little revenue, and unnecessary image problems. Meanwhile, makers of one free app, Zite, said they’re to deal with complaints they’ve been getting from publishers about copyright issues.

    Reading roundup: No big stories this week, but tons of little things to keep up on. Here’s a bit of the basics:

    — On social media: Facebook a “Send” plugin among a few dozen websites (including a couple of news sites) that allows private content-sharing. The Next Web’s Lauren Fisher that journalists should spend more time using Facebook, and Canadian j-prof Alfred Hermida a study he helped conduct about social media and news consumption.

    — The Guardian a local-news project it launched last year, saying the local blogs were “not sustainable.” PaidContent’s that while the blogs were useful, there are few examples of sustainable local-news efforts, and Rachel McAthy of Journalism.co.uk to try to find the value in the Guardian’s experiment.

    — The news filtering program Storify launched in public beta this week, prompting a New York Times  and pieces by GigaOM’s  and the Knight Digital Media Center’s  on the journalistic value of curation.

    — Thanks to its most recent content-farm-oriented algorithm tweak, Google’s traffic to all Demand Media sites is , which caused this week. Google, meanwhile, some more automatic personalization features to Google News.

    — The Lab’s Andrew Phelps wrote a great piece expounding on the journalistic utility of the humble (well, kind of humble) smartphone.

    — And for your deep-thinking weekend-reading piece, Harvard researcher Ethan Zuckerman’s on overcoming polarization by understanding each other’s values, rather than just facts.

    POSTED     April 29, 2011, 10:30 a.m.
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