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    With a year of guides to a better life, The New York Times hopes to convert more readers to subscribers
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    With a year of guides to a better life, The New York Times hopes to convert more readers to subscribers
    “This is all about how we can provide subscribers with the type of content that makes them feel like they’re getting insight they’re not getting anywhere else.” It’s also a bet on keeping some content subscriber-only, not subject to its five-articles-a-month metered paywall.
    By Christine Schmidt
    Will moving to radio put a strain on what makes The Daily work so well as a podcast?
    Plus: The daily news podcast space gets a little more crowded, The Guardian experiments with an augmented player, and Amazon wants to turn your blog into a podcast.
    By Nicholas Quah
    Are news publishers directly liable for embedding tweets that contain images not created by that tweeter?
    A New York federal judge ruled that when publishers from The Boston Globe to Vox Media to Breitbart “caused the embedded tweets to appear on their websites, their actions violated plaintiff’s exclusive display right.”
    By Shan Wang
    What strategies work best for increasing trust in local newsrooms? Trusting News has some ideas
    “It’s not so much about gaming Facebook’s algorithm or working with the Facebook changes as much as it is taking advantage of Facebook as a truly social platform.”
    By Christine Schmidt
    Should we consider fake news another form of (not particularly effective) political persuasion — or something more dangerous?
    Plus: The lines between “fake news” and psyops, the Russians shared real news too, and “reality apathy.”
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    The Guardian’s new podcast player for the web tries to make listening a little more interactive (but not interruptive)
    The Guardian Mobile Innovation Lab’s podcast player for the mobile web lets you listen to a show without using a podcast app, and get phone notifications that point you to links and graphics at relevant points in the story as the audio plays.
    By Shan Wang
    Newsonomics: 11 questions the news business is trying to answer in 2018
    West Coast news chaos, a new leader at WordPress, the decline of digital display — and is The Washington Post really profitable?
    By Ken Doctor
    Connecting reporters with experts, Sciline wants to improve the quality of today’s science reporting
    “There’s so much pressure right now that it’s very tempting, more than ever, to just go with something…Often, it’s only your conscience and sense of journalistic responsibility that prevents you from hitting publish.”
    By Ricardo Bilton
    Comfortable in its first language, this German business publisher hopes to build a global audience off its English edition
    Part of Handelsblatt Global’s strategy is trying to be ruthlessly practical about its position in the market: “If you get an American reader, nobody would ever switch from The New York Times for us.”
    By Shan Wang
    Facebook’s Campbell Brown: “This is not about us trying to make everybody happy”
    “If someone feels that being on Facebook is not good for your business, you shouldn’t be on Facebook. Let’s be clear about that…I don’t see us as the answer to the problem.”
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    With a year of guides to a better life, The New York Times hopes to convert more readers to subscribers
    “This is all about how we can provide subscribers with the type of content that makes them feel like they’re getting insight they’re not getting anywhere else.” It’s also a bet on keeping some content subscriber-only, not subject to its five-articles-a-month metered paywall.
    By Christine Schmidt
    Will moving to radio put a strain on what makes The Daily work so well as a podcast?
    Plus: The daily news podcast space gets a little more crowded, The Guardian experiments with an augmented player, and Amazon wants to turn your blog into a podcast.
    Are news publishers directly liable for embedding tweets that contain images not created by that tweeter?
    A New York federal judge ruled that when publishers from The Boston Globe to Vox Media to Breitbart “caused the embedded tweets to appear on their websites, their actions violated plaintiff’s exclusive display right.”
    What We’re Reading
    Poynter / Melody Kramer
    “First, it’s meeting and connecting with people in a place where they already have an existing habit — their calendar. Second, it’s priming them to associate an interest — space — with the coverage from The Times. Third, it’s sporadic enough to feel special, doesn’t feel as overwhelming as a push notification, and is a way for a news organization to really take ownership of a beat (and a platform.)”
    The New York Times / Michael M. Grynbaum
    “The Fox News venture joins an increasingly crowded — and increasingly niche — marketplace for web-only streaming television. ESPN is starting its subscription service, ESPN Plus, in the spring. About five million viewers signed up last year for HBO and Cinemax digital subscriptions. Last week, CBS said it counted five million subscriptions to its CBS and Showtime streaming services, and it plans to add two more stand-alone products, CBS Sports HQ and an offering branded for ‘Entertainment Tonight.'”
    Washington Post
    “We have been reminded over many months now that, as journalists, we need more than a soul. We also need a spine.”
    The Verge / Casey Newton
    “But what if those very meaningful groups are run by foreign actors working to make the country more polarized? It’s impossible to say how ‘meaningful’ the groups Russia created were to its members, but the troll farms worked to create pages around subjects that generate the maximum level of emotion. Often, they were tied to identity. For immigration matters, there was a page called ‘Secured Borders.’ For Black Lives Matter, there was ‘Blacktivist.’ For religion, there were ‘United Muslims of America’ and ‘Army of Jesus.’ By 2016, those pages collectively had hundreds of thousands of American followers.”
    Columbia Journalism Review / Mathew Ingram
    “Facebook is a threat not necessarily because it’s evil but because it does what it does very well, which is to target people for advertisers,” says Martin Nisenholtz, former head of digital strategy at The New York Times. The question, he says, is “has it become so dominant now that it’s become essentially a monopoly, and if so what should publishers do about it?”
    Fast Company / Katharine Schwab
    “‘The one thing that’s been so interesting about the algorithms project that I would never have guessed is that we’ve ended up having to build algorithms all the time,’ says Julia Angwin, who has been writing about data and surveillance for more than a decade. It’s a resource-intensive, deeply challenging task in a media landscape where few are willing to invest in large projects, but Angwin views her team’s reporting as essential to holding big tech companies accountable and providing lawmakers with concrete evidence of wrongdoing. ‘We’re going to get police hats for our New Year’s presents,’ she jokes.”
    The Guardian / Emily Bell
    “It is no longer a debate just about graphic images, moments of death and personal privacy, but also of whether different contexts demand different standards. It is a question of whether newsrooms now have to spend more time explaining the false mechanics of stories as they do the facts as they happen. And it is a question of whether the platforms are even capable of managing what has been asked of them.”
    Wired / Erin Griffith
    “On RoBhat Labs’ Botcheck.me, a website created by two Berkeley students to track 1500 political propaganda bots, all of the top two-word phrases used in the last 24 hours — excluding President Trump’s name — are related to the tragedy: School shooting, gun control, high school, Florida school. The top hashtags from the last 24 hours include Parkland, guncontrol, and guncontrolnow.”
    Bloomberg / Aoife White
    “The social media giant must delete data it’s already gathered, or it will face fines of €250,000 ($312,000) a day, a Belgian court ruled. Facebook ‘doesn’t sufficiently inform’ clients about the data it gathers on their broader web use, nor does it explain what it does with the information or say how long it stores it, the Brussels Court of First Instance said in a statement.”
    Digiday / Lucia Moses
    “There’s a lot of shock and floundering and not knowing what to do inwardly, while outwardly, there’s a lot of posturing and big statements from publishers saying, ‘This is our new course of action; this is what we’re going to do.’ It’s far too early to know what the path forward is. Of course, this will have an impact — we’re just not sure what.”
    AndroidForMobile Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.