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    It’s time for a “radical shift in the balance of power between the platforms and the people,” the British parliament says
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    It’s time for a “radical shift in the balance of power between the platforms and the people,” the British parliament says
    Facebook acts like “digital gangsters,” “Mark Zuckerberg has shown contempt” toward governments, and the company’s “deliberate” strategy was to send uninformed executives to answer Parliament’s questions.
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    So is Spotify now the inevitable next King of Podcasts? Or will it struggle, like everyone else, to get past Apple?
    Plus: The U.K. wants to open up funding for independent audio, Newt Gingrich gets his own World, and a new show about being a working mother.
    By Nicholas Quah
    “Rebuilding a local news ecosystem”: Knight pledges $300 million to local news, free speech, and media literacy organizations
    Among the grantees: The American Journalism Project gets $20 million, Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press gets $10 million, and The News Literacy Project gets $5 million. And there’s more, lots more.
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    How can local TV news fix its young person problem? Maybe it needs to look more like Vox
    “While remixing the stories did not resonate every time, we did see positive results on the group of hard news stories where we altered the storytelling approach.”
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    If Facebook wants to stop the spread of anti-vaxxers, it could start by not taking their ad dollars
    “You have nothing to be ashamed of for your parents not vaccinating you. It wasn’t something you researched and decided against, you were just doing the whole ‘being a kid’ thing.”
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    Clicks are an “unreliable seismograph” for a news article’s value — here’s new research to back it up
    “People frequently click on stories that are amusing, trivial, or weird, with no obvious civic focus. But they maintain a clear sense of what is trivial and what matters.”
    By Christine Schmidt
    Acing the algorithmic beat, journalism’s next frontier
    In a world where key decisions are increasingly driven by algorithms, journalists need to take a closer look at how they work and how they impact individuals and society. Here’s how The Wall Street Journal is approaching it.
    By Francesco Marconi, Till Daldrup, and Rajiv Pant
    Inside Inside’s new local newsletters and its plans to keep scaling (with 750,000 active subscribers on board)
    Inside.com recently raised $2.6 million from SeedInvest, Jason Calacanis, and “hundreds of our readers” to keep the growth going (but not relying on reader revenue).
    By Christine Schmidt
    How Capital Public Radio covered a community’s high suicide rate (and developed a tool for residents to keep)
    “This is almost a plague in this county. Why wouldn’t we want to raise awareness and do it in a way that really had an impact?”
    By Christine Schmidt
    BuzzFeed News and the Toronto Star team up to report on misinformation around the Canadian election
    “It appears in our paper, it’s going to appear in BuzzFeed, and vice versa.”
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    A major British government review proposes some light regulation of Google and Facebook (and perhaps new limits on the BBC)
    “For a society to have ready access to high-quality news is essential not just for the moment, but for the long-term sustainability of democracy.”
    By Joshua Benton
    In Liverpool, a football podcast has grown into a real media company — based mostly on listener payment, not advertising
    Plus: Slow Burn heads to TV, MeUndies prove podcast advertising works, and Morning Edition changes its tune.
    By Nicholas Quah
    With Supporting Cast, Slate wants to build the paid-membership layer of podcasting
    As Spotify tries to ramp up a podcasting-as-closed-garden model, Slate wants to offer some of that approach’s benefits while remaining open.
    By Nicholas Quah
    Want to reduce political polarization? Save your local newspaper
    In places that lose a newspaper, split-ticket voting decreases by almost 2 percent. Without trustworthy political information, we fall back on party labels and our partisan identities.
    By Joshua P. Darr, Johanna Dunaway, and Matthew P. Hitt
    It’s time for a “radical shift in the balance of power between the platforms and the people,” the British parliament says
    Facebook acts like “digital gangsters,” “Mark Zuckerberg has shown contempt” toward governments, and the company’s “deliberate” strategy was to send uninformed executives to answer Parliament’s questions.
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    So is Spotify now the inevitable next King of Podcasts? Or will it struggle, like everyone else, to get past Apple?
    Plus: The U.K. wants to open up funding for independent audio, Newt Gingrich gets his own World, and a new show about being a working mother.
    “Rebuilding a local news ecosystem”: Knight pledges $300 million to local news, free speech, and media literacy organizations
    Among the grantees: The American Journalism Project gets $20 million, Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press gets $10 million, and The News Literacy Project gets $5 million. And there’s more, lots more.
    What We’re Reading
    South China Morning Post
    “Over the past two years, the Post has gradually transitioned from operating as a local newspaper to a global media company serving a wider international community.” (So long, sudoku and horoscopes.)
    The Verge / Sean Hollister
    Things aren’t looking great for physical media.
    Wired / James Vlahos
    “Tunstall-­Pedoe’s vision of computers responding to our queries in a single pass — providing one-shot answers, as they are known in the search community — has gone mainstream. The internet and the multibillion-­dollar business ecosystems it supports are changing irrevocably. So, too, is the creation, distribution, and control of information — the very nature of how we know what we know.”
    The New York Times Company
    And library card holders can also get access away from their local branch — though only in the form of 24-hour passes.
    TechCrunch / Josh Constine
    “Swipe up to give $10 to ProPublica” can’t be too far off. (Though this is really about Instagram getting your credit card info on file.)
    Poynter / Daniel Funke
    “I hadn’t thought through how challenging that would be. In startup terms, it’s an acquisition, ultimately. Why should a university just provide you with space and allow you to continue? There’s a huge question here about existing brands.”
    Twitter / George Polk Awards
    To APM Reports for season 2 of “In the Dark.” Also winning a Polk today: The Baton Rouge Advocate, The New York Times, The New Yorker, the Tampa Bay Times, the Miami Herald, ProPublica, Reuters, Undark, PBS NewsHour, The Arizona Republic, The Washington Post, WSOC in Charlotte, and the Netflix documentary “The Bleeding Edge.”
    New York Times / Kevin Roose
    “What if stemming the tide of misinformation on YouTube means punishing some of the platform’s biggest stars?”
    The Daily Beast / Will Sommer
    “Of the top five most quote-tweeted posts on the site in 2018, four of them were phrased as questions.”
    The Guardian / Roy Greenslade
    “Unlike most of its rivals, Metro makes a healthy profit based on a simple business model: advertising revenue. ‘Every issue must turn a profit,’ says Young. ‘There has to be 50 percent advertising, and that’s how we decide the number of pages we produce.’ Profits over the past couple of years have been healthy, running at about £1m a month.”
    AndroidForMobile Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.
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