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    Does your Google News change based on whether you’re conservative or liberal?
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    Does your Google News change based on whether you’re conservative or liberal?
    Plus: “Most of the people reviewing Burmese content spoke English.”
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    How The Globe and Mail is covering cannabis, Canada’s newest soon-to-be-legal industry
    Just for starters, the Globe will have an expanding hub of coverage online, more live events, and a high-priced premium subscription newsletter for industry professionals.
    By Shan Wang
    Has the GDPR law actually gotten European news outlets to cut down on rampant third-party cookies and content on their sites? It seems so
    Some third-party cookies were still present, of course. But there was a decrease in third-party content loaded from social media platforms and from content recommendation widgets.
    By Shan Wang
    Democracy is cracking and platforms are no help. What can we do about it? Some policy suggestions
    Here are a few in a new Canadian report: greater transparency requirements for digital news publishers, holding social media companies legally liable for the content on their platforms, and mandatory independent audits for platform algorithms.
    By Christine Schmidt
    How media coverage of epidemics helps raise anxiety and reduce trust
    “Telling people about scary diseases without informing them about ways to protect themselves is a good way to cause anxiety and emotional distress — and a bad way to build trust in government health agencies.”
    By Yotam Ophir
    Major internet companies might want to push their own point of view, but can they also take care of misinformation please and thank you
    Three-quarters of Americans surveyed say social networks should show the same set of news topics to all users, ignoring their stated interests or browsing history. (Someone should tell them about newspapers!)
    By Christine Schmidt
    I want bad news and I want it fast: That’s the business model for Factal, a business-focused company from the founders of Breaking News
    A consumer product is on the roadmap, but for now, Factal is aimed at businesses and will cost several thousand dollars a month.
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    American podcasters are starting to pay more attention to their international audiences (and their pounds, loonies, and euros)
    Plus: Slow Burn returns for Season 2, the new class of podcast apps plays around with paid models, and figuring out podcasting’s Audible future.
    By Nicholas Quah
    How not to be a parachute partner: ProPublica’s figured out how to collaborate with local newsrooms without bigfooting them
    “We’re really proud of our work at the Southern Illinoisan, but we have a flashlight, not a lighthouse.”
    By Christine Schmidt
    An analysis of 16,000 stories, across 100 U.S. communities, finds very little actual local news
    “Sometimes a story was literally just a YouTube video that they were linking to.”
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    Does your Google News change based on whether you’re conservative or liberal?
    Plus: “Most of the people reviewing Burmese content spoke English.”
    By Laura Hazard Owen
    How The Globe and Mail is covering cannabis, Canada’s newest soon-to-be-legal industry
    Just for starters, the Globe will have an expanding hub of coverage online, more live events, and a high-priced premium subscription newsletter for industry professionals.
    Has the GDPR law actually gotten European news outlets to cut down on rampant third-party cookies and content on their sites? It seems so
    Some third-party cookies were still present, of course. But there was a decrease in third-party content loaded from social media platforms and from content recommendation widgets.
    What We’re Reading
    The Guardian / Hannah Ellis-Petersen
    “Malaysia was the first country in Southeast Asia to introduce a fake news law and rights groups feared it set a worrying precedent for the region, with the Philippines, Singapore and Cambodia all claiming they too were going to table legislation tackling the problem — though none have yet been passed. Baguilat added that the decision to repeal the law ‘sends a signal to the wider region that positive human rights change is within reach.'”
    The Atlantic / Scott Nover
    “The nation’s hyper-partisan political divide — encouraged by a president who calls the media ‘the enemy of the people’ — is creating tensions that can be as challenging for news startups as they are for more established newsrooms. And for a small publication covering the military, the stresses seem magnified.”
    Morning Consult / Joanna Piacenza
    “As illustrated in other media bias research, partisans were divided over the accuracy of the headlines by outlet: Democrats were more likely to say articles attached to CNN headlines would be accurate, while Republicans said the same of Fox News.”
    The Washington Post / Paul Farhi
    “Kaczynski’s four-member group — known as KFile after its 28-year-old founder — may be the foremost practitioner of the journalistic equivalent of dumpster diving. Their reportorial MO is simple, if tedious: They dig through social-media posts, old audio and video recordings and forgotten speeches, articles and books to find troubling comments uttered or written by the people they’re investigating.”
    WAN-IFRA
    “While newspaper paywalls remain relatively rare in Latin America, two papers there have achieved success with paid-content strategies: O Globo in Brazil and Clarín in Argentina.”
    Journalism.co.uk / Marcela Kunova
    “One of the most successful formats has been speaking directly to the camera, as a friend or family member would, making clear eye contact with the audience on Snapchat to add a degree of friendship and personal connection to the story.”
    Twipe / Mary-Katharine Phillips
    “Last year Bay Area News Group, a Digital First Media company, experimented with the message to visitors it flagged as using an adblocker. While typically they had only asked for the adblocker to be turned off, now they asked to turn it off or support their journalism by subscribing. During the experiment, roughly 9 percent of all new subscribers came from this pop-up.”
    About the BBC Blog / Bethan Jinkinson
    “Death is another subject which seems to be preying on our users’ minds. Videos such as ‘Why dying is not as bad as you think’ and ‘the Irish approach to death’ have been really popular on social media, with millions of views and thousands of comments and shares.”
    AndroidForMobile Foundation
    “Given the threat to democracy and the rise of autocracy around the world, now is the time to support, not decry, legitimate journalism and to reaffirm our commitment to free speech and a free press. The AndroidForMobile Foundation stands with its fellows and with all journalists who are working hard — under increasing financial pressure, political attack, and physical threat — to discover the facts and report the truth without fear or favor.”
    Medium / Rose Ciotta
    “Please fill out so I can describe the need for extra resources in local newsrooms. I was able to test the idea in two newsrooms over the past year: The Olean Times Herald in rural New York State and the Beaver County Times in western Pennsylvania with the help of the Jim Bettinger News Innovation Fund of the John S. Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University. The fund was launched with support from the Knight Foundation and Knight fellowship alumni and friends.”
    AndroidForMobile Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.
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